Crossrail bus changes: TfL plans to halve bus frequencies between Greenwich and Charlton by switching route 180

Route 180 bus
All change: The 180 will switch to North Greenwich if Transport for London’s plans go ahead

Transport for London is planning to halve the bus service between Greenwich town centre and Charlton as part of changes set to be brought in for the launch of Crossrail services at Woolwich and Abbey Wood.

Route 180, which links Charlton with Greenwich and Lewisham, will be diverted at the Woolwich Road flyover to run to North Greenwich station, with small cuts to be made to the frequency of the 472, which will continue to run to North Greenwich. The 129 service, which runs from North Greenwich to Greenwich town centre, will be extended to Lewisham as part-compensation.

TfL says 770 passengers will have to change buses each day as a result of the changes – and with no plans outlined to boost the frequency of the 177, the number of buses between Greenwich town centre and Charlton will drop from 12 buses per hour to six.

Both the 180 and 472 will also see changes at the other ends of their routes: the 180 will run to the Quarry development in Erith rather than the Belvedere industrial estates, while the 472 will run via Western Way in Thamesmead to terminate at Abbey Wood station, instead of its current route via Nathan Way.

Other changes will see route 178, which serves Shooters Hill Road, return to using double-decker buses to cater for expected extra demand for travel to Woolwich. Double-deckers will also return to routes 244 and 291, which run to Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

A new service, the 301, will run from Woolwich to Bexleyheath via Nathan Way (replacing the 472) and Abbey Wood. There are other service changes affecting the Erith and Belvedere areas, which can be seen on the TfL website.

There are no changes to buses along Charlton Road, or the 380 or 486 services.

The change to the 180 will make it harder to reach Greenwich from Charlton, Woolwich, Plumstead and Abbey Wood.

Route 472
There will be fewer buses on the 472 on Bugsby’s Way, but more buses via the slower Woolwich Road route

What does this mean if I want to travel from Charlton to North Greenwich?

If you live east of Charlton station, there will be more buses to North Greenwich (20 rather than 16 per hour in peak times), but you’ll be more likely to get a slower service. There will be fewer buses on the faster 472 service via Bugsby’s Way – eight per hour instead of the current 10. More buses will run on the slower route via the Woolwich Road flyover – 12 per hour on the combined 161 and 180, compared with six on the 161 now.

From Charlton station, there will be no change to the 486. But from the stop in Anchor and Hope Lane next to Makro, there will now be 16 buses per hour rather than 18 (not including the morning-only extra services from here on the 472, which will continue). Or you could cross to the stop by the Antigallican, where 12 buses per hour will run on the slower route via Woolwich Road flyover, shared between the 161 and 180 (compared with six now on the 161).

Local transport campaigners have long complained about the “dance of death” where services from Charlton station to North Greenwich are split across the three stops serving the Woolwich Road/Anchor & Hope Lane junction. These changes bring more buses across these stops (28 rather than 24), but will mean more people will have to do that “dance of death” at a junction Greenwich Council says is the borough’s most dangerous.

From west of Charlton station, it’s a straightforward increase – from six 161 buses per hour to 12 on the combined 161 and 180 service. If you travel to/from the Greenwich Ikea site, however, you’ll see the overall level of service up the Greenwich Peninsula is hardly changing – it’ll increase from 44 to 45 buses per hour in the rush hour.

From Charlton Village – no change. Nothing is planned for the 422 or 486.

Bus stop Current peak service Proposed peak service
Charlton Lane 472 N G’wich: 10
161 N G’wich: 6
180 Greenwich: 6
177 Greenwich: 6
472 N G’wich: 8
161/180 N G’wich: 12

177 Greenwich: 6

Anchor & Hope Lane 472 N G’wich 10*
486 N G’wich: 8
472 N G’wich: 8*
486 N G’wich: 8
Rose of Denmark 161 N G’wich: 6
180 Greenwich: 6
177 Greenwich: 6
161/180 N G’wich: 12

177 Greenwich: 6

Greenwich Ikea site All buses: 44* All buses: 45*

*Does not include the extra buses on the 472 between Charlton and North Greenwich, which run mornings only and are due to continue.

I want to travel from Charlton to Greenwich town centre – what do I do?

You’ll have to wait longer if you want to travel from Charlton to Greenwich – you’ll only have the six buses per hour on the already-busy 177 to rely on in future. A possible – but more expensive – alternative will be the National Rail service from Woolwich Dockyard, Charlton or Westcombe Park stations to Maze Hill or Greenwich.

Or you could change buses at Greenwich Ikea, although the proposed 129 service from there to Greenwich and Lewisham will be cut to a bus every 12 minutes – less frequent than the current 180.

The steep cut to bus services linking Greenwich and Woolwich will inconvenience many passengers. If you’re one of them, be sure to fill in the consultation and tell your local representatives what you think.

What about my buses from Charlton to Woolwich?

The cut to the 472’s frequencies mean there will be slightly fewer buses to Woolwich from Anchor & Hope Lane – down from 30 buses an hour at peak times to 28. Up the hill, no changes are planned to the 53, 54, 380 or 422.

Where’s my bus from Woolwich Road to Lewisham gone?

The Charlton stretch of Woolwich Road loses its bus service to Lewisham under TfL’s proposals – breaking a link which has endured since the days of trams.

TfL suggests you change buses at Greenwich Ikea, but the proposed 129 service from there to Greenwich and Lewisham will be cut to a bus every 12 minutes – less frequent than the current 180. There are also fears of widespread traffic congestion when the Ikea store opens in late 2018, around the time these changes are due to take effect.

Taking a 177 to Greenwich town centre and changing there for a 129 or 199 will be a more sensible – but still fiddly – option. Those who want to change to other buses in Lewisham will lose out by having to pay another fare. TfL wants to expand its Hopper fare so it offers unlimited bus changes in an hour rather than just two – there is no date for this yet.
If you’re one of them, be sure to fill in the consultation and tell your local representatives what you think.

There will be no change to the 54 or 380 services to Lewisham, while there is a half-hourly National Rail service from Charlton to Lewisham.

TfL map

Squeezed finances at TfL – but questions over modelling

These changes are being made against a background of austerity at TfL, whose finances are being squeezed both by central government cutting its funding and mayor Sadiq Khan freezing some fares.

Technical notes supplied by TfL indicate that it expects demand for bus travel between Greenwich and Woolwich – including Charlton – to drop after Crossrail services begin in December 2018. It also expects demand to drop along Charlton Road, although there is no cut planned for services there.

It is not made clear how TfL has reached this conclusion, although it could reflect some journeys from Woolwich to places such as New Cross and Peckham switching from bus to Crossrail and London Overground.

TfL’s demand modelling for the area has already come in for criticism from local councils at the Silvertown Tunnel public examination, and this cut may mean it comes under closer scrutiny.

TfL demand map
Transport for London’s map of projected demand – higher demand in red, lower demand in green. We’ve added in some place names. TfL predicts huge extra demand in Woolwich by 2021, but lower demand in Charlton and Greenwich.

I have a view on these changes – what do I do?

This isn’t a done deal – your views can influence what happens next.

* Take part in TfL’s consultation on these changes. It closes on 17 September.

* Tell your local representatives – especially London Assembly members, whose job it is to scrutinise TfL, and councillors, who should already have been consulted.

* We’re sure local campaigners Transport for Charlton will be active here – so let them know what you think and offer your services if you can.

We will be keeping an eye on what happens next.

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Charlton Road’s bridge barriers are coming down – but get set for disruption

Charlton Road, 15 February 2015
Work begins today on fixing the bridges that carries Charlton Road over the Blackwall Tunnel Southern Approach – but expect some disruption while work is carried out.

The bridge at Charlton Road was damaged following a collision in October 2013, in which a car veered off the carriageway and knocked some of the railings into the A102 below.

Nobody was injured, but following safety inspections the Charlton Road bridge and its sister structure on Old Dover Road, Blackheath, had temporary barriers put in place last spring while Transport for London figured out what to do.

Now, “stakeholders” (that is, neither me nor you) were told last Thursday that work begins tomorrow. We managed to get hold of this via the Greenwich Cyclists newsletter, so thought it only polite to pass it on.

Remarkably, even this notification of essential safety work is being spun to make it look as if it’s a big bonus; rather than TfL belatedly acknowledging that its 46-year-old bridges weren’t up to scratch.

The Charlton Road Bridge and Old Dover Road Bridge over the A102 have been identified for refurbishment in order to improve user road safety. Transport for London (TfL) have appointed EM Highway Services to carry out this work.

To ensure the safety of pedestrians and personnel who will be carrying out these works, traffic management measures will be put in place at both locations.

Why are we doing this work?

Temporary concrete barriers have been installed at both bridges following a collision at Charlton Road Bridge, which caused damage to the existing parapet. The objective of this scheme is to replace the damaged parapet at Charlton Road Bridge and upgrade the parapet at Old Dover Road Bridge to enable them to contain any errant vehicle. The new parapets will be similar in appearance to the old parapets but the height will be slightly increased to 1.4metres to improve safety for cylists. Once the works are completed, the existing temporary concrete barriers and fence will be removed.

The Road Modernisation Plan is the biggest investment for a generation consisting of hundreds of projects to transform junctions, bridges, tunnels and pedestrian areas. Working with London’s boroughs it will make our roads safer and more reliable, and London will be a better place in which to live, work and travel.

What times will the work take place?

The parapet replacement works are planned to begin on Monday 16 February 2015 for approximately 6 weeks or until the work is completed. The general working hours will be from 09:30 to 15:30, Mondays to Fridays. Works will take place on Charlton Road Bridge between 16 February and 13 March 2015 and on Old Dover Road Bridge between 9 March to 3 April 2015.

To facilitate the works to be carried out safely, the existing concrete barriers will be temporarily repositioned in the footway until the parapet replacement work is completed, at which point all the temporary barriers will be fully removed from site. The repositioning of the barriers will be carried out at night time between 22:00 and 05:00 on weekdays.

Temporary two-way traffic lights will be deployed at each of the two bridges as and when required during these works and localised pedestrian diversions will also be put in place while these works take place.

What we would like you to know

As with all works on the Transport for London Road Network, we must balance possible disruption to residents with disruption to traffic. Working these hours provides us with the best chance to complete these works safely and as quickly as possible whilst minimising disruption.

Keeping London moving

Transport for London is firmly committed to minimising disruption. We have worked closely with our contractor, EM Highway Services and the Royal Borough of Greenwich in order to reduce the impact of these works on road users, local residents and businesses as far as possible.

I hope you will appreciate that a certain level of disruption is inevitable, and I apologise in advance for any inconvenience that may be caused as a result of these essential works. Should you require further information or an update during the delivery of these works, please contact our Streets Customer Services department on 0343 222 1234, email customerservices@tfl.gov.uk or via the web at www.tfl.gov.uk/contact.

So get set for a few weeks of disruption while some rather precarious work is carried out on the bridges. But at least the ugly barriers are finally coming down…