Judith Quin: Meet the Charlton author who wants to change your life

Judith Quin

Not getting what you want out of life? Charlton-based life coach JUDITH QUIN might be able to help. After working as an actress and qualified massage therapist, she’s now a vocal coach, helping people build up their confidence. Her first book, Stop Shoulding, Start Wanting, shares the tips she’s learned. You can meet her at a book signing at Waterstones in Greenwich at 6pm this Thursday, 29 November. She spoke to The Charlton Champion about her work and her life in SE7.

How did you end up becoming a life coach?
I’ve been a bit of a natural coach my whole life, I was the one my friends would come to for advice (not that coaches give advice). But in reality, I fell into it. A massage client asked me one day if, as an actress and sound healer, I knew anyone who could help her husband with public speaking.

I did the job, he nailed his talk and I started having other clients ask me the same. One of those clients asked me when I’d trained as a coach – I hadn’t ever heard of coaching! She said what I was doing was coaching and sent me a link to The Coaching Academy where she’d trained – I went to their free event and signed up.

What personal experiences do you bring to your sessions?
I specialise in vocal confidence, helping people to find their voice and be able to speak up for themselves, or speak in front of others, so I bring a lot of my skills as an actress. For the life-coaching part of what I do, clients can be so varied in their experiences the best thing I can bring is knowing how to listen, ask good questions, and hold clients accountable.

Could you describe a typical client and what they did they get out of your sessions>
The clients who get the most out of working with me are those who are ready to step up and take leadership of their life. Often I work with people who are ready for promotion at work, to step up to the next level in their business or public speaking engagements, or find the confidence to be heard. The results are usually more confidence and clarity to move forward, not just for speaking, or at work, but also in life.

In the words of a couple of my clients:

“A life changing experience. Cured my fear of public speaking. Boosted my self-confidence.”

“For years I have always been looking to others for answers. Working with Judith has made me realise that I have all the answers within… Coaching in my opinion is: productive, personal, positive problem-solving.”

What led you to write the book?
It had been in me for years, but when I became a coach and realised I wasn’t the only person who believed that to “should” through your life is a waste of energy it became clear. So many of my friends kept telling me I should (ironically!) but I wanted to put it out there as it was something I kept taking about.

How long have you lived in Charlton for?
It’ll be 12 years next year!

What are your favourite things about the area?
All the green space, the fact I can be in town in 25 minutes, Blackheath farmers’ market, and the old coffee hut in Charlton Park.

How does living in Charlton contribute to a happy and confident life?
All the above. And that I know lots of my neighbours.

What’s the one piece of advice you could give to someone trying to improve their life?
Well … other than “stop ‘should-ing'”…

You can’t change other people, you can only change you; but also, if you don’t tell people what you’re thinking or feeling about their behaviour, you can’t expect them to know, so you don’t give them the chance to change.

Judith Quin will be at Waterstones, 51 Greenwich Church Street SE10 9BL from 6-7pm on Thursday 29 November – book a ticket here. Stop Shoulding, Start Wanting is also available on Hive Books (to pick up at Ottie and the Bea on Old Dover Road) and Amazon.co.uk.

WIN A COPY OF THE BOOK! Charlton Champion members can win a free copy of Stop Shoulding, Start Wanting by answering a really easy question. Sign up at www.patreon.com/charltonchampion by noon on Sunday 2 December and follow the instructions there. You can help us keep the site running and have a chance of winning a book!


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Festive events in Charlton for Christmas 2018

The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery passing Charlton House, December 2016
© Rob Powell

As Christmas creeps closer, it’s quite possibly time to purchase some presents for your nearest and dearest – unless they only deserve a lump of coal this year…

Here is a round-up of the festive events The Charlton Champion has details of so far, but please let us know if you’re organising something that we’ve not spotted yet. Send us a message or leave a comment below, and we’ll update this list over the coming weeks.

  • On Saturday 24 November Pound Park Nursery hosts their Winter Wonderland from 10am to 1pm, head to the school for wintry treats, a raffle and extra special guests.
  • The Corner at 96 is open for Christmas on the 7th, 8th and 9th of December, keep an eye on their Instagram for further details.
  • On Sunday 9 December at 5.30pm, St Thomas Church presents their Community Christmas sing-a-long, song sheets will be provided and there will be a retiring collection.
  • Friends of Charlton Park have a Mince Pies and Meet Up evening at 8pm on Wednesday 12 December at the Big Red Bus Club.
  • Thursday 13 December has the British Oak pub on Old Dover Road hosting an 8pm Beer and Carols night in conjunction with St John’s Church, Blackheath.
  • On Christmas Day The Old Cottage Coffee Shop in Charlton Park are running its annual Christmas lunch for the elderly and it need volunteers and donations for the day. Please get in touch in person or on Twitter.

PLEASE SUPPORT THE CHARLTON CHAMPION

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Greenwich firefighters remember Invicta school bombing

Invicta memorial
Firefighters and pupils at the Invicta memorial this morning (photo: Steve Hunnisett)

Last year, The Charlton Champion visited Invicta Primary School in Siebert Road to see a memorial plaque unveiled to commemorate the 15 people killed when it was bombed in 1940. This morning, firefighters returned to remember the dead. Local war historian STEVE HUNNISETT was there.

A simple and informal ceremony this morning saw the present day firefighters from Greenwich Fire Station honouring their Second World War counterparts, twelve of whom were killed at Invicta Primary School on the night of 14 November 1940 when the school was in use as Station 54X of the Auxiliary Fire Service.

Ironically, it was a quiet night in London, with the main focus of the Luftwaffe’s attacks being the city of Coventry. It was because of this lack of activity in the capital that the firemen based at Invicta Road were still at their station when the parachute mine that was to destroy the school drifted down. The explosion buried the men under tons of rubble and apart from the twelve firemen, three civilians, including the school caretaker, were killed.

This morning’s wreath laying was carried out by Richard Melrose, station manager at Greenwich Fire Station and the Watch Manager of White Watch and was the third such ceremony since the plaque was installed by the charity Firemen Remembered in March 2017.


SUPPORT THE CHARLTON CHAMPION

The Charlton Champion provides news and information about issues and events in London SE7.
– Help us by telling us your stories
– Become a monthly patron at patreon.com/charltonchampion
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Remembering those who served in World War I: The stories behind the names on Charlton’s war memorials

Charlton War Memorial

This Sunday, 11 November, marks 100 years since the end of World War I. Our thanks to local historian BARBARA HOLLAND for this piece looking back at the lives of the local men who lost their lives in the “war to end all wars”.

Many of the names of those who died in World War I are recorded on public war memorials in towns and villages across the country. Charlton is home to three of these: the War Memorial in The Village and two in Charlton Cemetery, looked after by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The men whose names are inscribed on the memorials lost their lives in many different countries and different services.   Not all died during fighting: accidents and illness took their toll as well. Not all were young men: older men wanted to enlist as well to serve their country and use their experience and skills. Some lied about their age in order to join up. Not all the Charlton war dead were recorded on the memorial: other names have been found on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission database.

Behind the death of each of these men is a story of family loss. I’ve picked out just a few names to tell you a little bit more about them, their families and their service.

Charlton Village War Memorial

Money for the cross came from hundreds of small donations given in memory of the hundreds of local men who had died in the War. It has a bronze sword of sacrifice on the front face, with a bronze plaque and the names of the men inscribed on seven-stone tablets on the bases.

A new bronze tablet was placed over the original one in May 1955, to commemorate those who had died in both world wars. A new Book of Remembrance, listing the names of 314 men and one woman, was later dedicated by the Bishop of Woolwich at a service in St.Luke’s Church and is now kept on display in the church in a glass case. (Thanks here to Mike Leach who did the original research on the names in the Book of Remembrance).

Their stories

For Britain, the First World War started on 4 August 1914 and the earliest deaths on the Village memorial recorded were on 22 September. This was the date when Navy Stoker 1st Class, Thomas Arthur Jobbins, aged 28, lost his life when his ship, HMS Aboukir was sunk by a German U-boat off the Dutch coast. The same U-boat also sank HMS Cressy and HMS Hogue with a total loss of life of 1,450 men on the same day.

Thomas was the son of Albert and Margaret Jobbins of 10 Ransom Road, Charlton, and left a widow Annie Agnes Jobbins. Albert and Margaret sadly were to lose a second son, on 13 April 1917. He was John Frederick Jobbins, a private in the 6th Battalion of the Royal West Kent Regiment.

Wilfred Arthur Hewlett also lost his life, aged 32, on the Aboukir leaving a sister living at 9 Sandtoft Road, and Alfred Frederick Holford died, aged 35, on the Cressy leaving a widow living at 62 Inverine Road.

Thomas Henry Woodmore, Guardsman in the 1stBattalion Welsh Guards, was one of nearly 11,000 casualties on 11 November 1918, the final day of the war. Thomas was born in Charlton in 1895 to Thomas Jacob and Edith Woodmore, followed in 1899 by his brother Harold Francis. They lived at 49 Sundorne Road. Harold also enlisted, joining the 3rd Royal West Kent Regiment in 1917. He was posted on 20 November 1918, only a few days after his brother’s death. He survived the war after being discharged in 1919 with anaemia and lived until 1968.

The Charlton Memorial has the names of a number of brothers who lost their lives.

The Tumber brothers – the Tumber family, living at 686 Woolwich Road, lost three sons in the space of just five months. The first to die was John Robert Tumber, aged 22, on 9 July 1917. He was serving on the ship HMS Vanguard in Scapa Flow when it was rocked by a series of explosions. The ship sunk instantly, killing 843 out of the 845 men aboard.

Edmund David Tumber enlisted for six years with the 20th London Regiment in March 1914 at the age of 17. He was posted to France with the Royal West Kent Regiment in 1915 and wounded twice before being killed in action on 26 October 1917 aged 20.

George Edmund Tumber enlisted with 1st/19th London Regiment and died on 2 December 1917 at the age of 25, leaving a widow, Charlotte.

The Friday brothers – Herbert John Friday and William George Friday were the sons of William and Mary Friday who lived at 9 Hopedale Road. They enlisted together in the 20th London Regiment and were both killed in action on the same day – 20 October 1915. Herbert was 23 and William 25. Less than 2 months after their deaths a third brother, Ernest Percival, enlisted. He survived the war.

The George brothers – John Edward George (not on the memorial) and Thomas Hamlet George enlisted in the 6th Battalion The Buffs (East Kent) on the same day – 3 September 1914 – and died on the same day – 13 October 1915. John was 39 and Thomas 35. A third brother, Charles Arthur, also enlisted but survived the war. Their parents, Josiah and Angelina lived at 17 North Street. Thomas left a widow, Louisa, who lived at 38 Derrick Gardens.

Another 10 pairs of brothers also lost their lives – Atwell, Brooks, Daly, Hankins, Hussey, Kerswell, Lind, Lomas, Shorter, and Sturgis.

Thomas Edwin Brooker was one of 8 men named on the Village War Memorial who died when they were 50 or more years old. He was born in 1865 and had served in the Army prior to the War from 1887 to 1903, and re-enlisted on 13 August 1914. Although by then he was 48 years old, he declared his age as 40 years and 242 days. He served in France until 1 April 1915 when he developed rheumatic fever and returned to England to be treated in hospital. He was declared fit again on 2 July 1915, but died at Aldershot only a few weeks later on 11 August of a cerebral haemorrhage. He left a widow, Elizabeth, living at 58 Eversley Road.

Many of the men named on the Memorial were only teenagers when they died: two were only boys of 17:

Reginald Edgar S Pinson was the son of William and Mary Pinson who lived at 7 Charlton Church Lane. He enlisted with 6th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment and was shipped with the British Expeditionary Force to France on 1 June 1915. It was just over two months later when he was killed in action on 14 August 1915.

Harold William Allan was the son of William and Charlotte Allan living at 112 Charlton Lane. He was born in 1897, but had enlisted in the Royal West Kent Regiment on 16 July 1912 at the age of just 15, having declared his age to be 18 years and 3 months.   His battalion, the 1st, shipped to France on 15 August 1914. He was killed in action on 28 October 1914.

The last name I’ve picked out is A. Zeitz on the Royal Naval tablet on the Memorial. It is out of order so was added on at some point after the other names:

His full name is Arthur Alfred Alexander Zeitz, born in Berlin in January 1876 to Theodore and Helena Zeitz. He married his wife Christina Hanny in 1905 and they had one daughter Helena Margaret (Nellie) in 1908. By 1914, the family were living at 36 Atlas Gardens in Anchor and Hope Lane.

Arthur joined the Navy in 1897, where his place of birth is recorded as Marylebone and his occupation a carpenter. He served until 1906 when he bought himself out and joined the Royal Fleet Reserve. He then re-enrolled in July 1911 for 5 years, but served until demobbed on 14 February 1919. He died in August of that year and was buried on 20 August in Charlton Cemetery. His burial record shows his occupation as ‘crane erector’.

As to why his name is out of order, I don’t have an answer. His death may have been too late to be carved in alphabetical order, although the Memorial wasn’t unveiled until October 1920. Was there a question of whether his death wasn’t as a result of his war service?

Maybe, if he was German-born, anti-German feeling prevented his name being added?

Charlton Cemetery memorials

Charlton Cemetery has 59 graves containing burials from World War I which are maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

A War Cross commemorates these men, and there is also a special memorial located near the entrance which bears the name of 2 soldiers and 2 sailors whose graves are not marked by headstones.

The four men whose names are inscribed here died in this country, in very different circumstances.

Arthur Victor Lomas died on 28 March 1916 aged only 18. He was an Ordinary Seaman serving on the ship HMS Conquest. He was on the ship’s boat returning from shore leave near Harwich when it was lost in a snow storm. The boat foundered and all 39 men on board drowned. He lived at 16 Lydenburg Street with his parents, Joseph and Louisa Lomas, the second of their sons to die in the war. Arthur’s brother, Albert Henry Lomas had died a year earlier on 13 March 1915 while serving with the 2nd Devonshire Regiment in France. (Both names are on the Village Memorial).

Arthur William Powell served as a Rifleman with the 16th Battalion London (Queen’s Westminster Rifles) Regiment. He died on 10 December 1914 aged 40 after being run over by a lorry on Woolwich Road. He was married to Fanny Powell living at 66 Westcombe Hill, Blackheath, and had 2 daughters, Audrey born in 1902 and Edith born in 1908.

Maurice Smith, a Canadian by birth, landed in France on 19 May 1915 and died on 24 February 1916 age 51. He died in St. Bartholomew’s Hospital of wounds received while fighting in Hooge with the 7th Battalion Rifle Brigade. He left a widow, Fanny, and lived at 23 Wyndcliff Road. (Also on the Village Memorial).

Robert Ernest Stead died on 13 March 1916 aged 32. He was a deckhand on HMS Victory and died of illness while at Royal Navy Barracks at Portsmouth. His sister, Mrs E Cockshott, lived at 14 Tuskar Street, Greenwich.


SUPPORT THE CHARLTON CHAMPION

The Charlton Champion provides news and information about issues and events in London SE7.
– Help us by telling us your stories
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Remembrance events in and around Charlton and the Greenwich Roll of Honour

Charlton War Memorial
The war memorial in Charlton Village

As Remembrance Sunday approaches we thought it might be useful to compile a list of local events commemorating the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. Here’s what we’ve found so far:

Saturday 10th November

Wreath laying ceremonies at:

10.45am: Maze Hill War Memorial, Greenwich Park, Charlton Way, Junction with Maze Hill SE3
11.20am: St John’s Church, Stratheden Road, SE3
11.40am: St Luke’s Church, The Village, SE7
12 noon: Charlton Cemetery, Cemetery Lane, SE7

Find more wreath laying ceremonies around the borough on Greenwich Council’s website.

Sunday 11th November

Remembrance services at St Luke’s and St Thomas’ churches, both at 10am on 11th November, with observance of the 2 minute silence. Everyone is welcome

The United Reformed Church on Bramshot Avenue has a remembrance service starting at 10.50am. All welcome.

 

Do you know of any other remembrance events in or around Charlton? Drop us a line and we’ll add them to this page.


The Greenwich Roll of Honour
greenwich roll of honourRob Powell, friend of the Charlton Champion and occasional contributor  has  a new book available:

The names of Charlton’s war dead feature in a new publication released to commemorate the centenary of the Armistice. The Greenwich Roll of Honour: 1914-1918 reproduces the names of the fallen compiled by the Metropolitan Borough of Greenwich at the end of the First World War. The old borough included Greenwich, Charlton, Kidbrooke, and parts of Deptford and Blackheath.

The 48 page booklet lists over 1800 names, accompanied by new photography of local memorials and a foreword by the Revd Canon Chris Moody from St Alfege Church in Greenwich. It’s available to buy now locally for £5 at the Old Cottage Coffee Shop in Charlton Park or online.

What’s happening at Royal Greenwich Heritage Trust? An update from Cllr Gary Parker

Charlton House SE7
Charlton House is managed by Royal Greenwich Heritage Trust. Photo by Neil Clasper.

An update on activities at Royal Greenwich Heritage Trust from board member and Charlton councillor Gary Parker:

I would like to update you on the work of the Royal Greenwich Heritage Trust (RGHT) which has been busy managing and developing their significant portfolio of Royal Borough of Greenwich heritage assets.

Much has taken place at the Trust over the last few month, and residents will be aware that Greenwich Heritage Centre i Woolwich closed its doors on 21 July to make way for Phase I of the Creative District development.

A new facility is in development with the Royal Borough of Greenwich with public access to a new Research Room. The Greenwich Archive Users Forum has been established and RGHT are working with the Forum to ensure access to the borough’s archive collections continues and can be enjoyed by many more residents in our community in the future. The Museum & Archive team are now based at Charlton House.

Pauline Watson, the archivist, has continued to deal with enquiries from the public by email and telephone since the closure of the Heritage Centre, and is looking forward to working with researchers in person again as soon as the new facility is up and running. At the moment she is carrying out some incredibly useful research into past repairs and maintenance of Charlton House since the 1920s, the Trust will be sharing some of its findings on its blog in the coming weeks. 

Layers of London

RGHT is providing the ‘Hub’ at Charlton House for a new project, Layers of London. Launched at an event last week, the project, funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund in partnership with London Metropolitan Archive and University of London, aims to work with the community to record layers of ‘London’s rich past’. The first meeting at Charlton House saw a wide attendance, not only from the Charlton and wider Greenwich communities but from interested people across the south east. Some very interesting projects were shared at the meeting and anyone can take part by adding their story to the site. RGHT looks forward to seeing the content grow over the next two years as the project develops. 

Making Woolwich

The Making Woolwich exhibition, from the Heritage Centre is the focus of the teams work now as they manage the redesign and relocation of the display to Woolwich Town Hall. This exhibition opened in December 2016 to celebrate the 300-year history of the Royal Artillery. Elements of this story will transfer to the Town Hall in November where new audiences can find out about the important story of the Royal Artillery in Woolwich and the men and women who have served in the Borough over the last 300 years. The rest of the Museum & Archive collections will not be mothballed during this period of closure. The Trust team will take this opportunity to develop a programme of exhibitions and events that will see the collections travel out into the community. 

WWI Centenary

Charlton Village War Memorial
The war memorial in Charlton. The borough’s war memorials are maintained by Royal Greenwich Heritage Trust. Photo by Neil Clasper.

As the centenary of the end of the First World War approaches RGHT has 4 Tommies’ from the There but not There project. If community groups are interested in loaning a Tommy for an event they can contact Edward@rght.org.uk for details. You can find out more about the First World War Victoria Cross recipients of the borough on the RGHT blog where each week the story of one of the four local heroes will be revisited. 

The new RGHT What’s On leaflet is now available. You can pick up a copy at Charlton House. You can also collect a copy of the Woolwich History Walk leaflet, designed and printed with a generous grant from the Ministry of Defence Community Covenant Fund. If you can’t drop into Charlton House, you can download the leaflet here www.greenwichheritage.org/visit/woolwich-history-walks. Alternatively, if you would like to take part in the walk or would like copies of either the adult or family version for your group please contact office@rght.org.uk and copies can be sent to you for display. 

I will publish a further report early in 2019.

Best Wishes, Cllr Gary Parker

The Charlton Champion is keen to know: do you use or visit Royal Greenwich Heritage Trust facilities? What do you think of their current plans? What could they be doing, and what are they are getting right (or wrong)? Let us know in the comments below (but keep it constructive, please!)


Support The Charlton Champion

The Charlton Champion provides news and information about issues and events in London SE7.
– Help us by telling us your stories
– Become a monthly patron at patreon.com/charltonchampion
– Buy Neil a coffee at ko-fi.com
– Donate directly to the site at paypal.me/charltonchampion

Can you help St. Thomas’ night shelter to help the homeless?

St Thomas Church Charlton-1
St Thomas’ Church on Woodlands Terrace, SE7.

We’ve written before about St. Thomas’ Church night shelter for homeless people, but with winter approaching and homelessness rising, we thought we’d catch up with what’s happening this year, and how local residents can help:

Every winter, thousands of people in the UK end up with no home. It’s a national problem and sometimes it feels like there is nothing we can do. But there is. Greenwich Winter Night Shelter is a team of people from local churches and communities who provide beds, food and company for people without a home. From 14 November 2018 to 12 March 2019, volunteers will give a few hours each week, helping dozens of people get back on their feet.

Would you like to join a team that makes a big difference to people’s lives?

Volunteers are needed for evening, overnight and breakfast shifts – particularly overnight and breakfast shifts. The Shelter operates at a different venue each night of the week, and full training is provided.

For more information, please contact project manager Helen Othen – email: gwnsprojectmgr[at]gmail.com.

The Greenwich Winter Night Shelter network:

Sunday: St James’ Church Hall, Kidbrooke Park Road, SE3 0DU – Nearby buses: 178, 286, 132, 89
Monday: Christ Church, Trafalgar Road, SE10 9EQ – Nearby buses: 177, 180, 286, 422,
129, 188, 386

Tuesday: St George’s Church, Glenluce Road, SE3 7SQ – Nearby buses: 286, 108, 422
Wednesday: OneSpace Youth & Community Centre, Kidbrooke Park Road, SE3 9YY – Nearby buses: B16, 178
Thursday: St Mark’s Church Centre, 22 Greenwich South Street, SE10 8TY – Nearby buses: 386, 180, 199
Friday: St Thomas’ Church, Woodland Terrace, SE7 8EW – Nearby bus: 380
Saturday: Blackheath & Charlton Baptist Church, Marlborough Lane, SE7 7DF – Nearby buses: 89, 178, 386

Make a donation

If you’d like to donate food, clothing or money to the night shelter you can contact the project coordinator above or additionally for St. Thomas’ Church, contact Revd Bennett Spong or Churchwarden Jim Kinsella.


Support The Charlton Champion

The Charlton Champion provides news and information about issues and events in London SE7.
– Help us by telling us your stories
– Buy Neil a coffee at ko-fi.com
– NEW! Become a monthly patron at patreon.com/charltonchampion
– NEW! Donate directly to the site at paypal.me/charltonchampion